Wayne RESA

EDM4 Math 3 (Everyday Math)
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Wayne Resa - Math / Grade 3 / Mathematics / EDM4 Math 3 (Everyday Math)
5 Curriculum Developers
Course Description:
Unit
Unit Abstract
Practice Standards
Concepts from Previous Units
Connections to Upcoming Units
Key Terms / Vocabulary
Lesson Plan Sequence
Language Support
X1- Math Tools, Time, and Multiplication
(Week 1, 3 Weeks)

In this unit, children recall how to use a variety of math tools to solve problems and tell time to the nearest minute. This unit also lays the foundation for developing multiplication and division strategies. Elapsed time (Lessons 1-6 and 1-11) are moved to Unit 2.​ Parts of Lesson 1-12 are moved in practice opportunities for upcoming units. Lesson 1-13 is moved to Unit 4. The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

 

- Estimation helps to see whether or not our answers are reasonable.

- Rounded numbers are approximate and not exact.

- Multi-digit numbers can be built up or taken apart in a variety of ways. These parts can be used to create estimates in calculations rather than using the exact numbers involved.

- Multiplication is related to addition and involves counting groups of like size and determining how many there are in all.

- Division can be interpreted as fair sharing

- Charts, tables, and bar graphs are used to display data.

- Graphs are used to compare data.

- An analog clock can be used to tell time to the nearest minute.


 

Students will have opportunities to:

  • Model real-world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations (MP. 4)

  • Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions (MP.4)

  • Choose appropriate tools (MP.5)

  • Use tools effectively and make sense of your results (MP.5)


- Addition determines the whole in terms of the parts. Subtraction determines the missing part.
- Addition and subtraction are inverse operations.
- Flexible methods of computation for addition and subtraction involve decomposing and composing numbers in a variety of ways.
- Multiplication is related to addition and involves counting groups of like size and determining how many there are in all.
- Repeatedly adding the same quantity, using a grouping picture or forming a rectangular array are strategies for representing repeated addition equations.
- Arrays are a way of representing both repeated addition and skip counting.
- The length of time can be measured using standard units such as, seconds, minutes, hours, and days.
- An analog clock can be used to tell time to the nearest five minutes.
- Bar graphs and picture graphs are used to display data.


- Some problem solving situations require more than one operation to solve and find the solution.
- Place value strategies that were used for 2 digit addition and subtraction problems can be applied to 3 digit addition and subtraction problems.
- Multiplication and division have an inverse relationship.
- Division can be interpreted as repeated subtraction.
- Division names a missing factor in terms of the known factor and the product.
- The duration of an event is called elapsed time and it can be measured.


array, bar graph, close-but-easier numbers, column, data, differences, division, division symbol, elapsed time, equal grouping, equal groups, equal shares, equal sharing, essay, estimate, fact family, factors, fact triangle, gram, kilogram, mass, masses, mathematical model, multiplication, multiplication symbol, number grid, open number line, pan balance, precise, product, round, row, strategy, weight, zero, reasonable, tens, hour, minutes, interval, unknown, equation

 

Bold: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X2 - Number Stories & Arrays
(Week 4, 5 Weeks)

In this unit, children make sense of one- and two-step number stories involving all four arithmetic operations. They represent situations with diagrams, arrays, pictures, words and equations. Through creating, sharing, comparing, and interpreting representations, children improve their problem solving strategies and further their understanding that problems can be solved in more than one way. The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

 

- Some problem solving situations require more than one operation to solve and find the solution.

- Multiplication and division can be used to solve word problems involving situations involving equal groups and arrays.

- Division can be interpreted as finding the number of equal groups or the size of each group.

- Depending on the context, remainders can be interpreted as “leftovers”.

- The duration of an event is called elapsed time and it can be measured.


 

Students will have opportunities to:

  • Make sense of their problems (MP.1)
  • Reflect on their thinking as they solve on the problem (MP.1)
  • Check whether their answer makes sense (MP.1)
  • Compare their strategies with other students (MP.1)
  • Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gestures, tables, graphs and concrete objects (MP.2)
  • Make sense of the representations they used (MP.2)

- Estimation helps to see whether or not our answers are reasonable.

- Rounded numbers are approximate and not exact.

- Multi-digit numbers can be built up or taken apart in a variety of ways. These parts can be used to create estimates in calculations rather than using the exact numbers involved.

- Addition can be used to solve word problems involving situations such as “adding to”, “putting together” and “comparison”.

- Multiplication is related to addition and involves counting groups of like size and determining how many there are in all.

- Division can be interpreted as fair sharing

- An analog clock can be used to tell time to the nearest minute.


- Multiplication and division have an inverse relationship.

- Division names a missing factor in terms of the known factor and the product.

- When you multiply two numbers in any order, you will get the same answer.

- Place value strategies that were used for 2 digit addition and subtraction problems can be applied to 3 digit addition and subtraction problems.


Area, array, associative property, combinations of ten, commutative property, distributive property, dividend, division, divisor, efficient, elapsed time, equal groups, equation, estimate, factors, fraction, liter, multiples, number model, number sentence, open number line, product, quotient, remainder, representation, round, unknown, rows, columns, repeated addition, count by, reasonable, partition

 

Bold: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X3 - Operations
(Week 9, 4 Weeks)

In this unit, children use place value to develop and practice strategies for addition and subtraction of 2- and 3-digit numbers. They represent multiplication using arrays, and use these representations to develop strategies for solving multiplication facts. The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

 

- Multiplication and division can be used to solve word problems involving situations involving equal groups and arrays.

- When you multiply two numbers in any order, you will get the same answer.

- Place value strategies that were used for 2 digit addition and subtraction problems can be applied to 3 digit addition and subtraction problems.

- The algorithm for addition is an efficient strategy when computing larger numbers.

- There are patterns and relationships in basic facts. You can figure out new or unknown facts from the ones you already know.

- The Commutative Property can be used to figure out new or unknown facts.

- Multiplication and division have an inverse relationship.

- Data represented on a bar graph and picture graph can be used to solve addition and subtraction problems.


 

Students will have opportunities to:

  • Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gestures, tables, graphs, and concrete objects (MP.2)
  • Make sense of the representations they and others used (MP.2)
  • Make connections between representations (MP.2)
  • Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns and properties (MP.7)
  • Use structures to solve problems and answer questions (MP.7)

- Multiplication is related to addition and involves counting groups of like size and determining how many there are in all.

- Division can be interpreted as finding the number of equal groups or the size of each group.

- Arrays can be used to represent products.

- Charts, tables, and bar graphs are used to display data.

- Graphs are used to compare data.


- The algorithm for subtraction is an efficient strategy when computing larger numbers.

- Multiplication can be used to find unknown division facts. Division names a missing factor in terms of the known factor and the product.

- The Distributive Property can be used to figure out new or unknown facts.

- The Associative Property is used as a strategy to multiply single digit factors with multiples of ten.


adding a group, area, friendly numbers, column addition, counting up, equivalent, estimate, expand-and-trade subtraction, expanded form, expression, factors, facts table, function machine, helper fact, input, key, multiplication squares, open number line, output, partial-sums addition, partition, picture graph, precisely, reasonable, rule, scaled bar graph, scaled picture graph, square product, square units, subtracting a group, tile, turn-around rule, place value, hundreds, tens, ones, decompose, patterns, friendly jumps, unknown, array, equal groups

 

Bold Font: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X4 - Measurement & Geometry
(Week 13, 4 Weeks)

In this unit, children explore the geometric attributes of polygons and classify quadrilaterals into categories based on their attributes, they identify and measure the perimeters of polygons, and distinguish between perimeter and area. They develop multiple strategies to determine the areas of rectangles and extend those ideas to determine the areas of rectilinear shapes. The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

 

- Area is the two-dimensional space inside a region.
- Area is measured by covering or tiling.
- When finding the area of a rectangle, the dimensions represent the factors in a multiplication problem.
- The length around a polygon can be calculated by adding the lengths of its sides.
- Quadrilaterals can be classified according to the lengths of their sides.
- The broad category of “quadrilaterals” includes all types of parallelograms, trapezoids, and other four-sided figures.
- Polygons can be described and classified by their sides and angles.
- Polygons can be put together or taken apart to make other polygons.
- A Rectilinear is a polygon that has all right angles and is composed of more than one rectangle.
- The area of the rectilinear figure can be found by decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of the parts.

 

*Please Note: Lessons 4-1 and 4-2 were moved to Unit 7. The explorations from Lesson 4-3 are embedded in Practice Opportunities section.



Students will have opportunities to:

  • Explain their mathematical thinking clearly and precisely. (MP6.1)
  • Use an appropriate level of precision for their problem. (MP6.2)
  • Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language. (MP6.3)
  • Think about accuracy and efficiency when they count, measure, and calculate. (MP6.4)
  • Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties. (MP7.1)
  • Use structures to solve problems and answer questions. (MP7.2)

- Multiplication is related to addition and involves counting groups of like size and determining how many there are in all.
- Models such as an array is used to represent multiplication.
- Multiplication and division can be used to solve word problems involving situations involving equal groups and arrays.

Concepts from Previous Grades:
- Geometric figures can be analyzed and classified based on their attributes.
- 2-dimensional shapes can be identified by the number of its sides, vertices, and angles.
- Shapes help us describe, represent, and make sense of our world.
- Shapes can be combined to make new shapes.
- Shapes can be decomposed into other shapes.
- A rectangle can be tiled with squares lined up in rows and columns.


- Area of rectangles can be found by multiplying the side lengths.
- The area model can be used to partition larger factors in a multiplication problem.
- Area models are related to addition and multiplication.
- Shapes can be partitioned into parts with equal areas and the area of each part can be expressed as a unit fraction of the whole.
-The measurement of an unknown side length can be determined when given the perimeter of the polygon.


Angle, approximate, area, array, attributes, benchmark, composite unit, decompose, face, kite, parallel, parallelogram, perimeter, polygon, precise, quadrilateral, rectangle, rhombus, right angle, side, square unit, trapezoid, vertex, skip-count, repeated addition, length, width, distance, surface

 

Bold Font: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X5 - Fractions & Multiplication Strategies
(Week 17, 4 Weeks)

In this unit, children relate their part-whole understanding of fractions to visual and symbolic representations, including standard notation, and begin to explore fraction equivalence. They also develop multiplication fact strategies by working from their understanding of multiplication and known facts to find unfamiliar products by using arrays, area models, and properties of multiplication. The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

 

- The number above the bar in a fraction is the counting number. It tells how many parts we have. It is called a numerator. The number below the bar tells what is being counted. It tells you the fractional part that is being counted.

- When two fractions are equivalent that means there are two ways of describing the same amount by using different sized fractional parts.

- There are patterns and relationships in basic facts. You can figure out new or unknown facts from the ones you already know.

- - The Distributive Property can be used to figure out new or unknown facts. Factors can be decomposed to generate two facts that are easier to solve. This can be shown by breaking apart an array.


Students will have opportunities to:

  • Make sense of multiplication and division problems and persevere in solving them (MP. 1)

  • Attend to precision by moving from less sophisticated strategies to more efficient strategies for solving multiplication problems (MP. 6)

  • Use clear and precise language such as numerator, denominator, and fraction with increasing precision to discuss their reasoning (MP. 6)

  • Look for and make use of structure when working with fact families (MP. 7)


- Fractional parts are equal shares or parts of a whole or unit.

- Multiplication is related to addition and involves counting groups of like size and determining how many there are in all.

- Models such as an array is used to represent multiplication.

- There are patterns in multiplication, such as you can multiply factors in any order, you will get the same product.

- Division can be interpreted as fair sharing or as repeated subtraction.

- Multiplication and division have an inverse relationship.


-Fractions greater than, less than, and equal to one can be represented on the number line.

- Fractions can be compared using benchmark fractions and visual models such as the area model and number lines.

Equivalent fractions name the same point on a number line.

- A ruler is a measurement tool that can be partitioned into fractional parts for precise measurements.

- The Associative Property is used as a strategy to multiply single digit factors with multiples of ten.


whole, fraction, equal parts, partition, fractional parts, halves, thirds, fourths, quarters, sixths, eighths, numerator, denominator, unit fraction, non-unit fraction, same, different, size, equivalent fractions, subtract a group, add a group, helper facts, doubling, factors, product, missing factor, decompose, multiples, even, odd, pattern, near squares, break-apart strategy

Bold: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X6 - More Operations
(Week 21, 4 Weeks)

In this unit, children compare different approaches to solving the same problem and reflect on which strategies are more efficient and appropriate. They model multi-step number stories with one or more equations and represent the unknown quantities with letters. The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

- The algorithm for addition and subtraction is an efficient strategy when computing larger numbers.

- Multiplication and division have an inverse relationship.

- Division names a missing factor in terms of the known factor and the product.

- Larger factors can be decomposed to generate two facts that are easier to solve. This can be shown by breaking apart an array.

- A variable can be used to represent an unknown amount.


 

Students will have opportunities to:

  • Make sense of their problem (MP. 1)
  • Reflect on their thinking while solving the problem (MP. 1)
  • Persevere when the problem is hard (MP. 1)
  • Check whether their answer makes sense (MP. 1)
  • Solve problems in more than one way (MP. 1)
  • Compare their strategies with other students (MP. 1)
  • Make mathematical conjectures and arguments (MP. 3)
  • Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking (MP. 3)

- Place value strategies that were used for 2 digit addition and subtraction problems can be applied to 3 digit addition and subtraction problems.

- Some problem solving situations require more than one operation to solve and find the solution.

- Multiplication and division can be used to solve word problems involving situations involving equal groups and arrays.

- Division can be interpreted as finding the number of equal groups or the size of each group.

- The properties of multiplication can be used to figure out new or unknown facts. Factors can be decomposed to generate two facts that are easier to solve. This can be shown by breaking apart an array.


- Place value understanding and the Associative Property can be used to multiply multiples of 10.

- Arrays can be used to find the factor pairs of given products.

- The area model can be used to partition larger factors in a multiplication problem.


appropriate, efficient, equation, parentheses, unknown, variable, near squares, decompose, partition, equal groups, array, trade, ones, tens, hundreds, expanded form

 

Bold: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X7 - Fractions
(Week 25, 5 Weeks)

In this unit, children revisit volume measurement and focus on comparing, estimating, and measuring liquid volumes. They continue to develop an understanding of fractions as numbers by exploring a new area fraction model and fractions as representations of distances on number lines. The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

- The duration of an event is called elapsed time and it can be measured.

- Volume and mass are attributes of objects that can be estimated and measured using standard units.

- Liquid volume describes how much a container can hold.

- Different shaped containers can have the same volume.

-Fractions greater than, less than, and equal to one can be represented on the number line.

- Fractions can be compared using benchmark fractions and visual models such as the area model and number lines.

Equivalent fractions name the same point on a number line.

- A ruler is a measurement tool that can be partitioned into fractional parts for precise measurements.


Students will have opportunities to:

  • Model real-world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations. (MP.4)
  • Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions. (MP.4)
  • Choose appropriate tools. (MP.5)
  • Use tools effectively and make sense of your results. (MP.5)

- The length of time can be measured using standard units such as, seconds, minutes, hours, and days.

- An analog clock can be used to tell time to the nearest five minutes.

- Fractional parts are equal shares or parts of a whole or unit.

- The number above the bar in a fraction is the counting number. It tells how many parts we have. It is called a numerator. The number below the bar tells what is being counted. It tells you the fractional part that is being counted.

- When two fractions are equivalent that means there are two ways of describing the same amount by using different sized fractional parts.


- Further applications of problem solving skills will continue in unit 8 using all concepts established in prior units.

Connecting to 4th Grade:

-The larger the unit, the smaller the number you obtain as you measure.

- A two-column chart can be used to convert from larger to smaller units and record equivalent measurements.

-Decimals are another way of writing fractions, and are also called decimal fractions.

- Equivalent fractions can be created by multiplying both the numerator and denominator by the same number or by dividing a shaded region into various parts.


Benchmark, data, denominator, displace, distance, equal to, equal shares, equivalent, fraction greater than one, greater than, less than, length, line plot, liquid volume, liter, milliliter, numerator, scale, unit fraction, volume, whole, fractional parts, halves, thirds, fourths, eighths, sixths, partition, fraction, compare, elapsed time

 

Bold Font: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X8 - Multiplication & Division
(Week 30, 3 Weeks)

In this unit, children deepen and apply their understanding of multiplication, division and measurement.The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

- A ruler is a measurement tool that can be partitioned into fractional parts for precise measurements. (fourth of an inch)

- Place value understanding and the Associative Property can be used to multiply multiples of 10.

- Arrays can be used to find the factor pairs of given products.


Students will have opportunities to:

  • Make mathematical conjectures and arguments. (MP.3)
  • Make sense of other’s mathematical thinking. (MP.3)
  • Create and justify rules, shortcuts and generalizations. (MP.8)

- A ruler is a measurement tool that can be partitioned into fractional parts for precise measurements.

- Multiplication and division can be used to solve word problems involving situations involving equal groups and arrays.

- Division can be interpreted as finding the number of equal groups or the size of each group.

- The properties of multiplication can be used to figure out new or unknown facts. Factors can be decomposed to generate two facts that are easier to solve. This can be shown by breaking apart an array.


- The area model can be used to partition larger factors in a multiplication problem.

Fourth Grade:

- Prime numbers have only a factor of 1 and itself.

- Composite numbers have more than two factors.

-Fact extensions can be used to compute mental math strategies for all operations involving larger numbers.

-Flexible methods of computation for multiplication involve taking apart and combining numbers in a variety of ways, which require deep understanding of the operations and the properties of the operations.

- Data can be measured and represented on line plots in units of whole numbers or fractions. (halves, fourths, eighths)


argument, conjecture, factor pair, factors, multiple of 10, multiples, products, pattern, even numbers, odd numbers, unknown, place value, tens, ones, equal rows, array, multiply, divide, share

Bold Font: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X9 - Multi-Digit Operations
(Week 33, 4 Weeks)

In this unit, children further develop their understanding of multiplication and division as they apply basic fact knowledge to mentally solve number stories and multiply larger factors. The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

-Develop a deeper understanding of multiplication and division as they apply basic facts to solve number stories and multiply larger factors

-Calculate elapsed time more efficiently


Students will have opportunities to:

  • Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them (SMP1)
  • Model real world situations using graphs, drawing, tables symbols, numbers, diagrams and other representations (SMP4)
  • Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions (SMP4)

-Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes

-Basic multiplication and division fact knowledge is applied to solve problems involving larger factors



Fourth Grade:

-Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one-digit whole number, and multiply two two-digit numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations.

-Find whole-number quotients and remainders with up to four-digit dividends and one-digit divisors, using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and/or the relationship between multiplication and division.

-Use the four operations to solve word problems involving intervals of time



Basic fact, break-apart strategy, decompose, doubling, efficient, elapsed time, extended fact, extended fact multiplication, multiplication diagram, division diagram, partition


Bold Font: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.

The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.