Wayne RESA

EDM4 Math 4 (Everyday Math)
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Wayne Resa - Math / Grade 4 / Mathematics / EDM4 Math 4 (Everyday Math)
5 Curriculum Developers
Course Description:
Unit
Unit Abstract
Practice Standards
Concepts from Previous Units
Connections to Upcoming Units
Key Terms / Vocabulary
Lesson Plan Sequence
Language Support
X1 - Place Value; Multi-Digit Add/Sub.
(Week 1, 4 Weeks)

In this unit, students explore place-value concepts for multi-digit whole numbers. They use U.S. traditional addition and subtraction algorithm to add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers. The following big ideas are covered in this unit:

  • Reviewing and extending the base ten place value system to 1,000,000.

  • A number can be written using its name, standards, or expanded form.

  • Multi-digit numbers can be built up or taken apart in a variety of ways. These parts can be used to create estimates in calculations rather than using the exact numbers involved.

  • Using rounding is an appropriate estimation strategy for solving problems and estimating. Rounded numbers are approximate and not exact.

  • The algorithm for addition and subtraction is an efficient strategy when computing larger numbers.

  • The larger the unit, the smaller the number you obtain as you measure length.

  • Formulas such as, P = 2l + 2w or P = 2(l + w) or P= l + l + w + w can be used to find the sum of the side lengths of a rectangle.

  • Geometric figures can be analyzed and classified based on their properties (point, line, line segment, ray and angles).

  • Two lines are parallel if they never intersect and are always equidistant.

  • Two lines are perpendicular if they intersect in right angles (90°).


Students will have opportunities to:

  • Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gestures, tables, graphs, and concrete objects. (MP. 2)

  • Make sense of the representations used by self and others. (MP. 2)

  • Make connections between representations. (MP. 2)

  • Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns, and properties. (MP. 7)

  • Use structures to solve problems and answer questions. (MP. 7)


  • Unit 1 is review of previously taught 3rd grade units.

  • Flexible methods of computation for addition and subtraction involve decomposing and composing numbers in a variety of ways.

  • An algorithm can be used to solve addition and subtraction of three digit numbers efficiently.

  • Estimation helps to see whether or not our answers are reasonable.

  • Numbers can be rounded to nearest multiple of ten or hundred.

  • Geometry vocabulary terms reviewed from third grade are: parallel, vertex, point, polygon, ray, right angle, triangle, width, length, line, line segment, obtuse angle, acute angle, end points

  • The length around a polygon can be calculated by adding the lengths of its sides.


  • Unit 1 is review of foundational skills, which create a baseline to demonstrate growth over time.

  • Edges (sides), angles, and symmetry can be used to classify geometric figures.

  • Lines of symmetry for a 2-dimensional figure occur when a line can be drawn across the figure such that the figure can be folded along the line into matching parts.

  • Angle measures can be added or subtracted.

  • Unit Conversions will be expanded to include time.

  • Multi-step word problems are used to construct arguments to support their conjecture.


acute angle, angle, approximate, close-to estimation, column addition, convert, counting up, digits, endpoint, estimation, expanded form, formula, front-end estimation, intersect, kite, length, line, line segment, measurement scale, millions, number model, obtuse angle, parallel lines, parallel line segment, parallel ray, partial sums addition, pattern, perimeter, perpendicular, place value, places, plane, point, polygon, ray, regroup, right angle, right triangle, rounding, standard form, trade first subtraction, trapezoid, unknown quantity, U.S. traditional algorithm/subtraction, vertex, width, sum, difference, addend, decompose, hundreds, tens, ones, attributes

 

Bold: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X2 - Multiplication and Geometry
(Week 5, 4 Weeks)

In this unit, students explore various applications for multiplication. They classify shapes by properties and develop formulas for area and perimeter. The following big ideas are covered in this unit:

 

  • In multiplicative comparison problems there are two different sets. The comparison is based on one group being a particular multiple of the other (multiple copies).
  • One type of multiplicative comparison problem is when the product is unknown.
  • Prime numbers have only a factor of 1 and itself.
  • Composite numbers have more than two factors.
  • A whole number is a multiple of each of its factors.
  • The larger units can be subdivided into equivalent units. (time)
  • Two dimensional figures can be classified by angle measurement. An obtuse angle measures more than 90⁰. An acute angle measures less than 90⁰. A right angle measures exactly 90⁰.
  • Right triangles can be a category for classification. It has one right angle.
  • Two dimensional figures can be classified by parallel or perpendicular lines.
  • Some two dimensional figures are symmetric and have lines of symmetry. - - A line of symmetry divides a figure into two congruent halves that are mirror images of each other.

Students will have opportunities to:

  • Explain their mathematical thinking clearly and precisely (MP. 6)

  • Use an appropriate level of precision for our problem (MP. 6)

  • Use clear labels units and mathematical language (MP. 6)

  • Think about accuracy and efficiency when they count, measure and calculate (MP. 6)

  • Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns and properties (MP. 7)

  • Use structures to solve problems and answer questions (MP. 7)


Previously from 3rd Grade:

- Multiplication is related to addition and involves counting groups of like size and determining how many there are in all.

- In multiplication, one factor counts how many sets, groups, or parts of equal size are involved. The other factor tells the size of each set or part.

- Area is the 2-dimensional space inside a region. It’s measured by tiling.

- When finding the area of a rectangle, the dimensions represent the factors in a multiplication problem.

- The perimeter can be calculated by adding the lengths of its sides.

- Quadrilaterals can be classified according to the lengths of their sides.

Previously from 4th Grade Unit 1:

- Formulas such as, P = 2l + 2w or P = 2(l + w) or P= l + l + w + w can be used to find the sum of the side lengths of a rectangle.

- Geometric figures can be analyzed and classified based on their properties (point, line, line segment, ray and angles).

- Two lines are parallel if they never intersect and are always equidistant.

- Two lines are perpendicular if they intersect in right angles (90°).


- There are different types of multiplicative comparison problems. The group size could be unknown or the number of groups could be unknown.

- Acute, right and obtuse angles can be used as benchmark to estimate angle measurement.

- Angles can be measured by non-standard and standard units.

- Angle measures can be added or subtracted.

- Lines of symmetry for a 2-dimensional figure occur when a line can be drawn across the figure such that the figure can be folded along the line into matching parts.

- Mirror images of symmetric figures are the same size and have the same shape. They face in opposite directions.


Acute triangle, additive comparison, adjacent, argument, attribute, column, comparison statement, composite number, composite unit, conjecture, divisibility, equilateral triangle, factor, factor pair, formula, function machine, input, isosceles triangle, line of symmetry, multiple, multiplicative comparison statement, multiplicative relationship, obtuse triangle, output, prime number, product, properties, quantity, rectangular array, right triangle, row, rule, scalene triangle ,square array, square number, symmetrical, turn-around facts, times as much, multiplication, repeated addition, sets, two-dimensional, halves, equivalent, column, distance, sum, rectangle, pattern

 

Bold: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X3 - Fractions and Decimals
(Week 9, 4 Weeks)

In this unit, students explore fraction equivalence and compare and order fractions using different representations. They extend their understanding of fractions to decimals, comparing and ordering decimals using the same methods for comparing fractions. The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

- Equivalent fractions can be created by multiplying both the numerator and denominator by the same number or by dividing a shaded region into various parts.
- Fractions of the same whole can be compared by representing them visually, using benchmark fractions such as 0, ½ and 1, reasoning about sharing and division.
-The larger the unit, the smaller the number you obtain as you measure.
- A two-column chart can be used to convert from larger to smaller units and record equivalent measurements.
-Decimals are another way of writing fractions, and are also called decimal fractions.
-Decimals can be represented visually and in written form.
-Decimals are a part of the base ten system.
-The decimal point indicates the unit’s position.
-Comparisons of two decimals are only valid when the two decimals refer to the same whole.


Students will have opportunities to:

  • Make mathematical conjectures and arguments (MP. 3)
  • Make sense of others mathematical thinking (MP. 3)
  • Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, diagrams, and other representations (MP. 4)
  • Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions (MP. 4)

Previously Learned Concepts from 3rd Grade:
-Fractional parts are equal shares or parts of a whole or unit.
-Fractions greater than, less than, and equal to one can be represented on the number line.
- Fractions can be compared using benchmark fractions and visual models such as the area model and number lines.
-Equivalent fractions name the same point on a number line.
- The number above the bar in a fraction is the counting number. It tells how many parts we have. It is called a numerator. The number below the bar tells what is being counted. It tells you the fractional part that is being counted.
- When two fractions are equivalent that means there are two ways of describing the same amount by using different sized fractional parts.

 

Previously Learned Concepts from Earlier Units in 4th Grade:
-In multiplicative comparison problems there are two different sets. The comparison is based on one group being a particular multiple of the other (multiple copies).
-The larger units can be subdivided into equivalent units. (time)


-The meanings of the operations on fractions are the same as the meanings for the operations on whole numbers. (addition, subtraction & multiplication)

- A two-column chart can be used to convert from larger to smaller units and record equivalent measurements. (mass, capacity)

-Tenths can be expressed using an equivalent fraction with a denominator of 100.


benchmark, centimeter, common denominator, common numerator, denominator, equivalent fraction, hundredths, meter, metric, millimeter, numerator, reasoning, tenths, unit, unit interval, whole, equal, fractional parts, halves, thirds, fourths, sixths, partition, patterns, compare, least, greatest, greater than, less than, equivalent

 

Bold Font: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X4 - Multi-Digit Multiplication
(Week 13, 5 Weeks)

In this unit, children are introduced to the basic principles of multi-digit multiplication by focusing on extending multiplication skills and exploring the partial products method. They use their knowledge of multiplication to find the areas of rectangles and to convert units of measurement.The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

-Fact extensions can be used to compute mental math strategies for all operations involving larger numbers.
-Flexible methods of computation for multiplication involve taking apart and combining numbers in a variety of ways, which require deep understanding of the operations and the properties of the operations.
-Multi-digit numbers can be built up or taken apart in a variety of ways. These parts can be used to create estimates in calculations rather than using the exact numbers involved.
-Multi-digit multiplication can be illustrated and explained by using equations (partial products) and area models.
-When finding the area of a rectangle, the dimensions represent the factors in a multiplication problem.
- A two-column chart can be used to convert from larger to smaller units and record equivalent measurements. (mass, capacity, time)


Students will have opportunities to:

  • Make sense of their problems (MP.1)
  • Reflect on their thinking as they solve the problem (MP.1)
  • Keep trying when the problem is hard (MP.1)
  • Check whether their answer makes sense (MP.1)
  • Solve problems in more than one way (MP.1)
  • Compare strategies with others (MP.1)
  • Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns and properties (MP.7)
  • Use structures to solve problems and answer questions (MP.7)

- In multiplicative comparison problems there are two different sets. The comparison is based on one group being a particular multiple of the other (multiple copies).

-Multi-digit numbers can be built up or taken apart in a variety of ways. These parts can be used to create estimates in calculations rather than using the exact numbers involved.

-Using rounding is an appropriate estimation strategy for solving problems and estimating. Rounded numbers are approximate and not exact.

-The larger the unit, the smaller the number you obtain as you measure.

- A two-column chart can be used to convert from larger to smaller units and record equivalent measurements. (length)

- Formulas such as, P = 2l + 2w or P = 2(l + w) or P= l + l + w + w can be used to find the sum of the side lengths of a rectangle.


- Flexible methods of computation for division involve taking apart and combining numbers in a variety of ways, which require deep understanding of the operations and the properties of the operations.

-The meanings of the operations on fractions are the same as the meanings for the operations on whole numbers. (whole number times a fraction)

- A two-column chart can be used to convert from larger to smaller units and record equivalent measurements. (Customary system)


commutative property, decompose, distributive property, gram(g), kilogram (kg), liter(L), mass, milliliter (mL), partial-products multiplication, partition, ream, rectilinear figure, ones , tens, hundreds, thousands, double, digit, strategy, area, perimeter, patterns, place value, estimate, rows, length, width, factor, product, unit, compare, minutes, hours

 

Bold Font: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X5 - Fraction Computation and Measurement
(Week 18, 5 Weeks)

In this unit, children explore the whole in fractions as well as adding and subtracting fractions and mixed numbers. Students use these computation skills to answer questions about line plots. They are also introduced to adding tenths and hundredths.The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

 

-A non-unit fraction can be decomposed into smaller parts in more than one way.

-The meanings of the operations on fractions are the same as the meanings for the operations on whole numbers. (addition and subtraction)

-Tenths can be expressed using an equivalent fraction with a denominator of 100.

- Data can be measured and represented on line plots in units of whole numbers or fractions. (halves, fourths, eighths)

- Acute, right and obtuse angles can be used as benchmark to estimate angle measurement.

- Angles can be measured by non-standard and standard units.

- Lines of symmetry for a 2-dimensional figure occur when a line can be drawn across the figure such that the figure can be folded along the line into matching parts.

- Mirror images of symmetric figures are the same size and have the same shape. They face in opposite directions.



Students will have opportunities to:

  • Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gestures, tables, graphs, and concrete objects (MP.2 )
  • Make sense of the representations you and others use (MP.2 )
  • Make connections between representations (MP.2 )
  • Choose appropriate tools (MP. 5)
  • Use Tools Effectively and make sense of your results (MP.5)

- Equivalent fractions can be created by multiplying both the numerator and denominator by the same number or by dividing a shaded region into various parts.

- Fractions of the same whole can be compared by representing them visually, using benchmark fractions such as 0, ½ and 1, reasoning about sharing and division.

- Data can be measured and represented on line plots in units of whole numbers or fractions. (halves, fourths)

- Two dimensional figures can be classified by angle measurement. An obtuse angle measures more than 90⁰. An acute angle measures less than 90⁰. A right angle measures exactly 90⁰.

- Right triangles can be a category for classification. It has one right angle.

- Some two dimensional figures are symmetric and have lines of symmetry.

- A line of symmetry divides a figure into two congruent halves that are mirror images of each other.


-A non-unit fraction is a multiple of a unit fraction.

-The meanings of the operations on fractions are the same as the meanings for the operations on whole numbers. (multiplication)

-A protractor is a tool used to measure angles.

-Angle measures can be added or subtracted.


arc, clockwise, counterclockwise, decomposing, degree, fraction addition equations, full-turn, half-turn, like denominators, mirror image, mixed number, quarter-turn, reflex angle, rotation, straight angle, unit fraction, whole, numerator, denominator, value, equivalent, improper fraction, sum, difference, digit, title, horizontal, vertical, x-axis, right angle, acute angle, obtuse angle, decimal fraction, tenths, hundredths

 

Bold Font: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X6 - Division and Angles
(Week 23, 5 Weeks)

In this unit, students explore the relationship between multiplication and division by developing a method for dividing whole numbers and solving division number stories. They are introduced to protractors and explore using them to measure and construct angles.The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

- Flexible methods of computation for divisioninvolve taking apart and combining numbers in a variety of ways, which require deep understanding of the operations and the properties of the operations.

-Multiplication can be used to find the quotient of multi-digit division problems. (Partial Quotients, Multiplying Up, Area Model)

-Remainders can be interpreted differently depending on the context of the division problem.

- A two-column chart can be used to convert from larger to smaller units and record equivalent measurements. (Customary system - mass)

-A protractor is a tool used to measure angles.

-Angle measures can be added or subtracted.

-The meanings of the operations on fractions are the same as the meanings for the operations on whole numbers. (multiplication of fractions with whole numbers)


Students will have opportunities to:

  • Choose appropriate tools (MP. 5)
  • Use tools effectively and make sense of their results (MP.5)
  • Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns and properties (MP. 7)
  • Use structures to solve problems and answer questions (MP. 7)

-Flexible methods of computation for multiplicationinvolve taking apart and combining numbers in a variety of ways, which require deep understanding of the operations and the properties of the operations.

- Acute, right and obtuse angles can be used as benchmark to estimate angle measurement.

- Angles can be measured by non-standard and standard units.

-A non-unit fraction can be decomposed into smaller parts in more than one way.

-The meanings of the operations on fractions are the same as the meanings for the operations on whole numbers. (addition and subtraction).


- A two-column chart can be used to convert from larger to smaller units and record equivalent measurements. (Customary system – liquid volume)

-A non-unit fraction is a multiple of a unit fraction.

-The meanings of the operations on fractions are the same as the meanings for the operations on whole numbers. (multiplication of mixed numbers with whole numbers)

-Lessons 7-7 and 7-8 focus on using division skills to solve multiple step number stories and problem involving measurements.

-In Unit 8 lesson 8-2 students will use real life problems involving their knowledge of angles as additive.


complementary angles, dividend, divisor, extended division facts, full-circle protractor, half-circle protractor, half-dozen, ounce (oz), partial quotient, pound (lb), quotient, reflex angle, remainder, supplementary angle, ton (T), weight, unknown, missing factor, multiply, length, width, area, multiple, friendly number, product, unit fraction, acute angle, right angle, obtuse angle, straight angle, estimate

Bold Font: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X7 - Multiplication of Fractions and Measurement
(Week 28, 4 Weeks)

In this unit, children formalize their understanding of multiplying a fraction by a whole number. The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

- A two-column chart can be used to convert from larger to smaller units and record equivalent measurements. (Customary system – liquid volume)
-A non-unit fraction is a multiple of a unit fraction.
-The meanings of the operations on fractions are the same as the meanings for the operations on whole numbers. (multiplication of mixed numbers with whole numbers)
- Data can be measured and represented on line plots in units of whole numbers or fractions. (eighths)


Students will have opportunities to:

  • Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gestures, tables, graphs, and concrete objects. (MP. 2)
  • Make sense of the representations they and others use. (MP. 2)
  • Make connections between representations. (MP. 2)
  • Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalization (MP.8)

- A two-column chart can be used to convert from larger to smaller units and record equivalent measurements. (mass, capacity, time)

- A two-column chart can be used to convert from larger to smaller units and record equivalent measurements. (Customary system - mass)

-The meanings of the operations on fractions are the same as the meanings for the operations on whole numbers. (multiplication of fractions with whole numbers)

-A non-unit fraction can be decomposed into smaller parts in more than one way.

- Data can be measured and represented on line plots in units of whole numbers or fractions. (halves, fourths, eighths)

-Tenths can be expressed using an equivalent fraction with a denominator of 100.


-Further applications of problem solving skills will continue in unit 8 using all concepts established in prior units.


cup, gallon, pint quart, rectangular numbers, numerator, denominator, mixed number, improper fraction, one whole, repeated addition, strategy, convert, unit, length, unknown, product, quotient, decimal

 

Bold Font: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X8 - Fraction Operations & Applications
(Week 32, 4 Weeks)

In this unit, children apply their knowledge of fractions, number concepts, patterns and geometry to different real-world scenarios. The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

- Operations with fractions can be used to solve real world problems.

- Benchmark angles and additive angle measures can be used to solve real world problems.

- Operations with whole numbers can be used to solve mathematical problems.


Students will have opportunities to:

  • Make sense of their problem (MP.1)
  • Reflect on their thinking as they solve. (MP.1)
  • Solve problems more than one way. (MP.1)
  • Model real-world situations. (MP.4)
  • Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions. (MP.4)
  • Use tools effectively (MP.5)

- A two-column chart can be used to convert from larger to smaller units and record equivalent measurements. (Customary system – liquid volume)

-A non-unit fraction is a multiple of a unit fraction.

-The meanings of the operations on fractions are the same as the meanings for the operations on whole numbers. (multiplication of mixed numbers with whole numbers)

-Angle measures can be added or subtracted.

-The meanings of the operations on fractions are the same as the meanings for the operations on whole numbers. (addition and subtraction)

-Tenths can be expressed using an equivalent fraction with a denominator of 100.

- Lines of symmetry for a 2-dimensional figure occur when a line can be drawn across the figure such that the figure can be folded along the line into matching parts.


Fifth Grade:

- A fraction is another representation for division.

- Fractions may represent division with a quotient less than one.

- Equivalent fractions can be used to add and subtract fractions with unlike denominators.

- Previous understandings of multiplication can be applied to multiply a fraction with a whole number.

- The algorithm for multiplication is an efficient strategy when computing larger numbers.


equivalent name, fluid ounce, generalization, additive, angle, rhombus, trapezoid, symmetry, perimeter, area, sum, difference

Bold Font: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.