Wayne RESA

EDM4 Math 1 (Everyday Math)
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Wayne Resa - Math / Grade 1 / Mathematics / EDM4 Math 1 (Everyday Math)
2 Curriculum Developers
Course Description:
Unit
Unit Abstract
Practice Standards
Concepts from Previous Units
Connections to Upcoming Units
Key Terms / Vocabulary
Lesson Plan Sequence
Language Support
X1 - Counting
(Week 1, 4 Weeks)

In this unit, children will explore concepts such as counting, number grids, comparing numbers, and collecting and analyzing data from count. The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

 

- Counting On/Back are strategies for addition and subtraction.
- Counting can be connected to addition and subtraction.
- Addition and subtraction can be used to solve simple word problems.
- Numbers can be compared using comparative language such as “greater than”, “less than”, “larger than”, and “smaller than”.
- When counting by tens, the next number in the sequence is “ten more”.
- Skip-counting by fives and tens are efficient ways of counting.
- Charts are used to organize data to help answer questions.


Students will have opportunities to:

  • Choose appropriate tools. (MP.5)
  • Use tools effectively and make sense of their results. (MP.5)
  • Explain their mathematical thinking clearly and precisely. (MP.6)
  • Use an appropriate level of precision for their problem. (MP.6)
  • Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language. (MP.6)
  • Think about accuracy and efficiency when they count, measure, and calculate. (MP.6)

The following concepts are prerequisites for this unit which were learned in kindergarten:

- A number is made up of two or more parts.

- A number can be decomposed into its parts.

- Numbers are related to each other through a variety of relationships. For example 6 is one more than five and is four less than 10.

- Counting tells how many things are in a set.

- When counting a set of objects, the last word in the counting sequence names the quantity for that set.

- Addition can be thought of as placing two or more quantities together.
- Subtraction can be thought of as taking an amount away from a given quantity.
- Objects can be classified into different categories using identified attributes.


- When you add two numbers in any order, you’ll get the same answer.
- Subtraction is a missing-addend problem.
- Addition and subtraction can be used to solve word problems involving situations such as “adding to” and “taking from”.
- Two numbers may be compared by examining the amount of tens and ones in each number using words, models, and symbols greater than (>), less than (<), and equal to (=).
- Data can be displayed in a tally chart or a bar graph to help answer questions.


compare, count, count back, count up, data, estimate, number grid, number line, number story, skip counting, solve, tallies, tally chart, tally mark, organize, more, less, greater than, less than, larger than, smaller than, unknown, sum, difference, tens

 

Bold: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X2 - Introducing Addition
(Week 5, 4 Weeks)

In this unit, children work with addition and use it to model and solve number stories. The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

 

- When you add two numbers in any order, you’ll get the same answer.

- Addition and subtraction can be used to solve word problems involving situations such as “adding to” and “taking from”.

- The Adding to and Taking from word problem structures have a starting value, change, and an ending value.

- An equation with a symbol can represent the unknown amount in word problems.


Students will have opportunities to:

  • Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gestures, tables, graphs, and concrete objects (MP.2)
  • Make sense of their and other students’ representations (MP.2)
  • Make connections between representations (MP.2)
  • Model real-world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers, diagrams, and other representations (MP.4)
  • Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions (MP.4)

- Counting On/Back are strategies for addition and subtraction.

- Counting can be connected to addition and subtraction.

- Addition and subtraction can be used to solve simple word problems.

- A number can be decomposed into its parts.

- Numbers are related to each other through a variety of relationships. For example 6 is one more than five and is four less than 10.


- Models can be used to add and subtract numbers such as number lines.

- Addition names the whole in terms of the parts.

- Subtraction names a missing part.

- Addition can be thought as putting together and subtraction can be thought as taking apart.

- Combinations of 10 can be used to determine unknown facts.


add, count on, difference, equation, is equal to, minus, number model, number sentence, order, pattern, plus, represent, strategy, subtract, sum, table, ten frame, total, turn-around rule, unknown, decompose, break apart, combinations

Bold: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X3 - Number Stories
(Week 9, 4 Weeks)

In this unit, children continue to use addition and subtraction to model and solve number stories. They also connect counting to addition and subtraction. The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

 

- Models can be used to add and subtract numbers such as number lines.

- Addition names the whole in terms of the parts.

- Subtraction names a missing part.

- Addition can be thought as putting together and subtraction can be thought as taking apart.

- Counting can be connected to addition and subtraction.


Students will have opportunities to:

  • Make sense of number stories involving addition and subtraction. (MP.1)
  • Reflect on thinking while solving problems. (MP.1)
  • Persevere in solving problems when faced with difficult problems. (MP.1)
  • Check to see if answer makes sense. (MP.1)
  • Solve problems in more than one way. (MP.1)
  • Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns and properties. (MP.7)
  • Use structures to solve problems and answer questions, such as number patterns. (MP.7)

- A number is made up of two or more parts.

- A number can be decomposed into its parts.

- Larger numbers can be composed from two or more parts.

- Addition can be thought of as placing two or more quantities together.

- Subtraction can be thought of as taking an amount away from a given quantity, comparing two quantities, or find a missing part given the whole and the other part.

- When you add two numbers in any order, you’ll get the same answer.

- Subtraction is a missing-addend problem.

- Counting On/Back, Combinations of 10 and Turn Around Rule are strategies for addition and subtraction.


- Known facts can be used to determine unknown facts. (doubles & combinations of tens)

- When you add three numbers, you can pick any two numbers to add first and then add the third number. You will get the same answer.

- The equal sign is a symbol in an equation that shows that one amount is the same as another.


arrow rule, column, parts-and-total diagram, row, Frames and Arrows,number line, put together, take apart, pattern, skip-count, count on, count back, equation, add, subtract, sum, difference, addend, unknown

Bold: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X4 - Length and Addition Facts
(Week 13, 4 Weeks)

In this unit, children measure length using nonstandard units and begin working on addition fact fluency.They also connect counting to addition and subtraction. The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

- Data can be displayed in a tally chart or a bar graph to help answer questions.

- Combinations of 10 are all of the different ways to make 10.

- Both of the amounts in a double addition fact are the same.

- When you add three numbers, you can pick any two numbers to add first and then add the third number. You will get the same answer.

- Length of an object can be measured by placing the smaller object repeatedly along the length of the larger object.

- If the length of object 1 is equal to the length of object 2 and object 2 is the same length as object 3, then object 1 is the same length as object 3.

- If the length of object 1 is greater than the length of object 2 and object 2 is longer than object 3, then object 1 is longer than object 3.

- If the length of object 1 is less than the length of object 2 and object 2 is shorter than object 3, then object 1 is shorter than object 3.


Students will have opportunities to:

  • Make sense of their problem (MP.1)
  • Reflect on their thinking as they solve the problem (MP.1)
  • Keep trying when the problem is hard (MP.1)
  • Check whether their answer makes sense (MP.1)
  • Solve problems in more than one way (MP.1)
  • Compare their strategies with others (MP.1)
  • Model real world situations using graphs, drawings, tables, symbols, numbers diagrams and other representations (MP.4)
  • Use mathematical models to solve problems and answer questions (MP.4)

- Charts are used to organize data to help answer questions. (tally charts)

- When you add two numbers in any order, you’ll get the same answer.

- Counting On/Back and Turn Around Rule are strategies for addition and subtraction.

- A number can be decomposed into its parts.

- Numbers are related to each other through a variety of relationships. For example 6 is one more than five and is four less than 10.

 

Previous Grades:

- An object has several measurable attributes, such as length, weight, and size.

- Direct comparisons are made when objects are put next to each other and the ends are lined up.

- If an object is moved, its length does not change.


- Known facts can be used to determine unknown facts. (doubles & combinations of tens)

-Subtraction is an unknown addend problem. (Think Addition)

- The equal sign is a symbol in an equation that shows that one amount is the same as another.

- Multi-digit numbers can be built up or taken apart in a variety of ways.

- Concrete models, drawings, and place value strategies can be used to add and subtract within 100.

- Flexible methods of computation for addition and subtraction involve decomposing and composing numbers in a variety of ways.


addition fact, bar graph, combination of ten, doubles, double ten-frame, estimate, helper fact, length, measure,unit, counted by, shorter, longer, tally chart, data, represent, addends, compose, decompose, unknown

Bold: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X5 - Place Value and Comparisons
(Week 17, 4 Weeks)

In this unit, children investigate place value concepts for tens and ones. they use place value to compare and add 2-digit numbers. They also explore path measurement.The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

- Quantities up to 120 may be compared, counted, and represented in multiple ways, including grouping, pictures, words, number line locations, and symbols.

- Collections can be separated into equal groups of ten objects and can be counted by tens.

- Numbers larger than 10 can be represented in terms of tens and ones.

- Two numbers may be compared by examining the amount of tens and ones in each number using words, models, and symbols greater than (>), less than (<), and equal to (=).

- Addition and subtraction can be used to solve word problems involving situations such as “comparing”.

- The equal sign is a symbol in an equation that shows that one amount is the same as another.

- Concrete models, drawings, and place value strategies can be used to add and subtract within 100.


Students will have opportunities to:

  • Create mathematical representations using numbers, words, pictures, symbols, gestures, tables, graphs and concrete objects. (MP.2)
  • Make sense of the representations they and others use. (MP.2)
  • Make connections between representations. (MP.2)
  • Explain their mathematical thinking clearly and precisely. (MP.6)
  • Use an appropriate level of precision for their problem. (MP.6)
  • Use clear labels, units, and mathematical language. (MP.6)
  • Think about accuracy and efficiency when they count, measure and calculate. (MP.6)

- Numbers can be compared using comparative language such as “greater than”, “less than”, “larger than”, and “smaller than”.

- When counting by tens, the next number in the sequence is “ten more”.

- Skip-counting by fives and tens are efficient ways of counting.

- Numbers 11 through 19 can be represented as ten ones and some more ones. (kindergarten)

- Length of an object can be measured by placing the smaller object repeatedly along the length of the larger object.


- The groupings of ones and tens can be taken apart in different but equivalent ways. For example 56 can be decomposed into 5 tens and 6 ones or 4 tens and 16 ones.

- A hundred is a bundle of 10 tens. - Multi-digit numbers can be built up or taken apart in a variety of ways.

- Flexible methods of computation for addition and subtraction involve decomposing and composing numbers in a variety of ways.


Addend, cube, digits, exchange, long, ones place, teen number, tens place, bundle, group, regroup, compare, greater than, less than, equals, true, false, represent, unknown, length, count, add, subtract

Bold: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X6 - Addition Fact Strategies
(Week 21, 4 Weeks)

In this unit, children word toward fluency with addition facts. They also explore solving number stories. Telling time is moved to Unit 7. The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

- Known facts can be used to determine unknown facts. (doubles & combinations of tens)

- The groupings of ones and tens can be taken apart in different but equivalent ways. For example 56 can be decomposed into 5 tens and 6 ones or 4 tens and 16 ones.

- A hundred is a bundle of 10 tens. - Multi-digit numbers can be built up or taken apart in a variety of ways.


Students will have opportunities to:

  • Make mathematical conjectures and arguments (MP. 3)
  • Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking (MP. 3)
  • Create and justify rules, shortcuts, and generalizations (MP. 8)

- Addition can be used to solve word problems involving situations such as “adding to”, “putting together” and “comparing”.

- Subtraction can be used to solve word problems involving situations such as “taking from”, “taking apart” and “comparing”.

- Counting On/Back and Turn Around Rule are strategies for addition and subtraction.

- Combinations of 10 are all of the different ways to make 10.

- Both of the amounts in a double addition fact are the same.

- Collections can be separated into equal groups of ten objects and can be counted by tens.

- Numbers larger than 10 can be represented in terms of tens and ones.


-Subtraction is an unknown addend problem. (Think Addition)

-Mental math can be used to find 10 more or 10 less of a given two-digit number.

- Flexible methods of computation for addition and subtraction involve decomposing and composing numbers in a variety of ways.


equivalent names, flat, hundreds place, making 10, near doubles, add, count, part, whole, unknown, ones, tens, place value, regroup, exchange, sum, double, decompose

Bold: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X7 - Subtraction Strategies & Attributes of Shapes
(Week 25, 4 Weeks)

In this unit, children explore the relationship between addition and subtraction, compare different subtraction strategies and continue to work on fact fluency. They also explore the defining and non-defining attributes of 2-dimensional shapes. The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

-Subtraction is an unknown addend problem. (Think Addition)

- The defining attributes of shapes are always present features that classify a particular object.

- The non-defining attributes are features that may be present, but do not identify what the shape is called.

- Some shapes have sides, angles, and faces which can be counted.

-An analog and digital clock can be used to tell time to the nearest half hour.


Students will have opportunities to:

  • Look for mathematical structures such as categories, patterns and properties. (MP.7)
  • Use structures to solve problems and answer questions. (MP.7)
  • Create and justify rules, shortcuts and generalizations. (MP.8)

- Known facts can be used to determine unknown facts. (doubles & combinations of tens)

- Combinations of 10 are all of the different ways to make 10.

- Both of the amounts in a double addition fact are the same.

From Kindergarten:

- Shapes help us describe, represent, and make sense of our world.
- The attributes of shapes make them alike or different.

- Shapes have sides and angles, which can be counted and compared.

- Triangles, rectangles, squares and circles can be defined based on their attributes.


-Some shapes are flat (2-D) while other shapes are solid (3-D).

-Smaller shapes can be used to compose larger shapes and larger shapes can be decomposed into smaller shapes.

-Composite shapes are made using two or more shapes.

-Partitioning the whole can be thought of as cutting or splitting an amount equally.

-Fractional parts are equal shares or equal-sized portions of a whole.

-Fractional parts have special names that tell how many parts of that size are needed to make the whole. For example, fourths require four parts to make a whole.

-The more fractional parts required to make a whole, the smaller the parts. For example, fourths are smaller than halves.


attribute, clockwise, closed, defining attribute, digital clock, fact family, minute hand, non-defining attribute, function machine, open, polygon, rule, subtraction fact, think addition, vertex, unknown, pattern, addend, difference, sum, rectangle, triangle, square, sort, category, amount, missing number, double, ten, time

Bold: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X8 - Geometry
(Week 29, 4 Weeks)

In this unit, children learn about attributes of shapes, compose and decompose composite shapes, and divide shapes into halves and fourths. Children also continue to practice telling and writing time, work with bar graphs, and use thier understanding of place value and properties of operations to add and subtract larger numbers. The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

-Some shapes are flat (2-D) while other shapes are solid (3-D).

-Smaller shapes can be used to compose larger shapes and larger shapes can be decomposed into smaller shapes.

-Composite shapes are made using two or more shapes.

-Partitioning the whole can be thought of as cutting or splitting an amount equally.

-Fractional parts are equal shares or equal-sized portions of a whole.

-Fractional parts have special names that tell how many parts of that size are needed to make the whole. For example, fourths require four parts to make a whole. (halves and fourths)

-The more fractional parts required to make a whole, the smaller the parts. For example, fourths are smaller than halves.

-Mental math can be used to find 10 more or 10 less of a given two-digit number.


Students will have the opportunities to:

  • Make mathematical conjectures and arguments. (MP.3)
  • Make sense of others’ mathematical thinking. (MP.3)
  • Explain their mathematical thinking clearly and precisely. (MP.6)
  • Use an appropriate level of precision for their problem. (MP.6)
  • Use clear labels, units and mathematical language. (MP.6)
  • Think about accuracy and efficiency when they count, measure, and calculate. (MP.6)

- The defining attributes of shapes are always present features that classify a particular object.

- The non-defining attributes are features that may be present, but do not identify what the shape is called.

- Some shapes have sides, angles, and faces which can be counted.

-An analog and digital clock can be used to tell time to the nearest half hour.

- Collections can be separated into equal groups of ten objects and can be counted by tens.

- Numbers larger than 10 can be represented in terms of tens and ones.


-Thirds require three parts to make a whole. (Second grade)

-A quadrilateral is a polygon with 4 sides. (Second grade)

-Mental math can be used to find multiples of 10 more or 10 less of a given two-digit number.


composite, edge, equal shares, face, fourth, half, half-hour, half past, number-grid puzzle, quarter, surface, vertex, whole, sides, polygon, square, rectangle, triangle, partition, fractional parts, pieces, compose, decompose, two-dimensional shapes, three-dimensional shapes, cone, cube, cylinder, sphere, rectangular prism, pyramid, attributes, minutes, tens, ones

Bold: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.


X9 - 2-Digit Addition and Subtraction
(Week 33, 4 Weeks)
In this unit, children focus on adding and subtracting with 2-digit numbers. This unit reviews previously taught concepts and introduces some concepts that will be taught in second grade. The following big ideas will be covered in this unit:

- Multi-digit numbers can be built up or taken apart in a variety of ways. These parts can be used to create estimates in calculations rather than using the exact numbers involved. (two digit numbers)

- Flexible methods of computation for addition involve decomposing and composing numbers in a variety of ways. (two digit numbers)


Students will have the opportunities to:

  • Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them (MP.1)
  • Reflect on their thinking as they solve the problem (MP.1)
  • Keep trying when the problem is hard (MP.1)
  • Check whether their answer makes sense (MP.1)
  • Solve problems in more than one way (MP.1)
  • Compare their strategies with others (MP.1)
  • Use appropriate tools strategically (MP.5)
  • Use tools effectively and make sense of their results (MP.5)



-The equal sign is a symbol in an equation that shows that one amount is the same as another.

-Concrete models, drawings, and place value strategies can be used to add and subtract within 100.

-Smaller shapes can be used to compose larger shapes and larger shapes can be decomposed into smaller shapes.

-Composite shapes are made using two or more shapes.

-Partitioning the whole can be thought of as cutting or splitting an amount equally.

-Fractional parts are equal shares or equal-sized portions of a whole.

-Fractional parts have special names that tell how many parts of that size are needed to make the whole. For example, fourths require four parts to make a whole. (halves and fourths)


- Multi-digit numbers can be built up or taken apart in a variety of ways. These parts can be used to create estimates in calculations rather than using the exact numbers involved. (2-3 digit numbers)

- Flexible methods of computation for addition involve decomposing and composing numbers in a variety of ways. (2-3 digit numbers)

-Thirds require three parts to make a whole. (Second grade)


ruler, measure, height, units, unknown, estimate, change, compare, faces, edges, vertices, equal shares, equal parts, whole, tens, ones, halves, fourths, quarters


Bold: Listed in teacher's EDM4 edition

Normal Font: not listed in teacher’s edition as a vocabulary word but will be helpful for students in explanations


The following lesson plan sequence is obtained from Everyday Mathematics 4. Each lesson is aligned with a learning objective to inform the teachers on what students should be able to at the end of the lesson. The student objective informs the students of their learning goals for the day and it should be reviewed before, during and at the end of the lesson. Each lesson includes a mathematics task that should be implemented to meet the learning objectives. Teachers can select from the practice opportunities to reinforce the learning goals of the day.


The following language supports are for English Language Learners but could also be used to support any struggling learner in mathematics. The strategies are obtained from the SIOP model. The language objectives will support students' academic language development. The sentence stems and starters provides the support many students need to be able to participate in discussions and writing about mathematics.