Wayne RESA
RESA, MAISA MC3 Units
Unit Abstract

In this unit students examine the economic and political developments in the colonies prior to the end of the French and Indian War and assess how these developments affected life in the colonies. After reviewing the three colonial regions, students focus on the economic attributes of the colonies. They take an in-depth look at the Triangular Trade routes, including the Middle Passage, and its consequence for both continents. Students then explore the colonial labor force, noting differences between the New England and Southern colonies, and comparing the life of enslaved Africans and free Africans in the American colonies. Emphasis is placed on the effect of “one-crop economies” (plantation grown staple crops) in the south, and its influence on various groups of people and daily life in the Southern colonies. Students then shift their focus to New England and the Middle colonies, examining the diversity of economic activities and its affect on daily life in each region. Next, students investigate how colonial political experiences during the first half of the 18th Century influenced colonists’ views of their political rights and responsibilities. In doing so, they explore the shift of power from royal appointed governors to colonial representative assemblies and their influences on colonial life. Throughout the unit, students consider life in the British colonies from the perspectives of different groups of people including women, wealthy landowners, indentured servants, American Indians, free Africans, and enslaved Africans. Students explore how Africans living in North America drew upon their African past and adapted elements of new cultures to develop a distinct African-American culture. By the end of the unit, students construct generalizations about the reasons for regional differences in colonial America.

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Stage One - Desired Results

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Standards
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Compelling Question

How did life in the three colonial regions set the stage for colonists to join in the cause for independence?

Supporting Questions
  1. How did economic activities contribute to the significant differences among the colonial regions?
  2. How did colonial political experiences influence how colonists viewed their rights and responsibilities?
  3. How did the institution of slavery affect colonial development and life in the colonies?
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Content (Key Concepts)

African-American culture

colonial self-government

economic activities

generalizations

indentured servants

labor force

point of view/perspective

regional differences

royal government

slavery

staple-crops

Triangular Trade

Skills (Intellectual Processes)
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Stage Two - Assessment Evidence

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Unit Assessment Tasks
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Stage Three - Learning Plan

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Lesson Plan Sequence
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Resources
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Expectations/Standards
MI: Social Studies (2007)
5th Grade
US History & Geography
U2 USHG ERA 2 – Colonization and Setlement (1585-1763)
U2.1 European Struggle for Control of North America Compare the regional settlement patterns and describe significant developments in Southern, New England, and the mid-Atlantic colonies.
5 – U2.1.1 Describe significant developments in the Southern colonies, including
• patterns of settlement and control including the impact of geography (landforms and climate) on settlement (National Geography Standard 12, p. 167)
• establishment of Jamestown (National Geography Standard 4, p. 150)
• development of one-crop economies (plantation land use and growing season for rice in Carolinas and tobacco in Virginia) (National Geography Standard 7, p. 156)
• relationships with American Indians (e.g., Powhatan) (National Geography Standard 10, p. 162)
• development of colonial representative assemblies (House of Burgesses) (National Geography Standard 5, p. 152)
• development of slavery
5 – U2.1.2 Describe significant developments in the New England colonies, including
• patterns of settlement and control including the impact of geography (landforms and climate) on settlement (National Geography Standard 12, p. 167)
• relations with American Indians (e.g., Pequot/King Phillip’s War) (National Geography Standard 10, p. 162)
• growth of agricultural (small farms) and non-agricultural (shipping, manufacturing) economies (National Geography Standard 15, p. 173)
• the development of government including establishment of town meetings, development of colonial legislatures and growth of royal government (National Geography Standard 13, p. 169)
• religious tensions in Massachusetts that led to the establishment of other colonies in New England (National Geography Standard 13, p. 169 C, E)
5 – U2.1.3 Describe significant developments in the Middle Colonies, including
• patterns of settlement and control including the impact of geography (landforms and climate) on settlement (National Geography Standard 12, p. 167)
• the growth of Middle Colonies economies (e.g., breadbasket) (National Geography Standard 7, p. 156)
• The Dutch settlements in New Netherlands, Quaker settlement in Pennsylvania, and subsequent English takeover of the Middle Colonies
• immigration patterns leading to ethnic diversity in the Middle Colonies (National Geography Standard 10, p. 162, C, E)
U2.2 European Slave Trade and Slavery in Colonial America
Analyze the development of the slave system in the Americas and its impact upon the life of Africans.
5 – U2.2.1 Describe Triangular Trade including
• the trade routes
• the people and goods that were traded • the Middle Passage
• its impact on life in Africa (National Geography Standards 9, and 11; pp. 160 and 164 E)
5 – U2.2.2 Describe the life of enslaved Africans and free Africans in the American colonies. (National Geography Standard 5, p. 152)
5 – U2.2.3 Describe how Africans living in North America drew upon their African past (e.g., sense of family, role of oral tradition) and adapted elements of new cultures to develop a distinct African-American culture. (National Geography Standard 10, p. 162)
U2.3 Life in Colonial America
Distinguish among and explain the reasons for regional differences in colonial America.
5 – U2.3.1 Locate the New England, Middle, and Southern colonies on a map. (National Geography Standard 3 p. 148)
5 – U2.3.2 Describe the daily life of people living in the New England, Middle, and Southern colonies. (National Geography Standards 14 and 15; pp. 171 and 173)
5 – U2.3.3 Describe colonial life in America from the perspectives of at least three different groups of people (e.g., wealthy landowners, farmers, merchants, indentured servants, laborers and the poor, women, enslaved people, free Africans, and American Indians). (National Geography Standard 6, p. 154).
5 – U2.3.4 Describe the development of the emerging labor force in the colonies (e.g., cash crop farming, slavery, indentured servants). (E)
5 – U2.3.5 Make generalizations about the reasons for regional differences in colonial America. (National Geography Standard 6, p. 154)
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Wayne RESA