Wayne RESA
RESA, MAISA MC3 Units
Unit Abstract

This unit focuses on how the United States Constitution creates a limited form of government by delegating and reserving powers among federal, state, and local governments and the people.  Students begin with the principle of enumerated powers and examine some of the specific powers delegated to the federal government.  In doing so, they consider how the Constitution separates, checks, and balances the power of the federal government.  By comparing enumerated, reserved, and concurrent powers of federal and state governments, they consider how a federal system of government serves the needs of a diverse citizenry. Students then consider the complicated nature of federalism in the American system of government. Through case studies they explore the tension between the federal and state governments with a specific focus on the Commerce Clause, the Elastic Clause, and the Tenth Amendment.  Students consider how the principles of enumerated powers and constitutional supremacy have resulted in different perspectives on limited government.  Turning their attention to state government, students explore relations among the states under Article IV in the Constitution. They study revenue sources and responsibilities of state government, and investigate some of the challenges facing the government of the state of Michigan. Students also learn how citizens can monitor and influence state and local governments through mechanisms of direct democracy and the power of popular sovereignty.  Next, students focus on local government and the variety of organizational structures they employ. They identify issues of concern in their community and create an action plan to address these problems. Students then examine how the Framers ensured that individual rights would not be trampled by government. They explore the role of the 14th Amendment in extending the Bill of Rights as a limit to state power.  Throughout the unit, students apply the principles of rule of law and limited government in considering how a federal system of government meets the changing needs of a diverse citizenry.

 

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Stage One - Desired Results

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Standards
 
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Compelling Question

How are both knowledge about American constitutional government and actions by citizens essential components of effective government?

Supporting Questions
  1. How are power and responsibility distributed, shared, and limited in the American constitutional system of government?
  2. How does federalism serve the needs of a diverse citizenry?
  3. How can citizens influence state or local public policy or governmental action?
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Content (Key Concepts)

Bill of Rights

checks and balances

citizenship

concurrent powers

constitutional supremacy

enumerated powers

federalism

flexibility of government

limited government

local government

popular sovereignty

reserved powers

rule of law

separation of powers

strict vs. loose constructionist

 

Skills (Intellectual Processes)

Classifying/Grouping

Description

Identifying Perspectives

Issue Analysis

Problem Solving

Research

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Stage Two - Assessment Evidence

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Unit Assessment Tasks
 
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Stage Three - Learning Plan

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Lesson Plan Sequence
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Resources

Equipment/Manipulative

Card Stock paper

 

Chart paper

 

Markers

 

Student Resource

About Counties. National Association of Counties. 6 October 2015. http://www.naco.org/Template.cfm?Section=About_Counties

 

*Constitutional Rights Foundation. 6 October 2015. http://www.crf-usa.org/

 

The Constitution of the United States, Analysis and Interpretation. United States Government Printing Office. 22 August 2009.

 

*Inside Politics. CNN/Time. 6 October 2015. http://www.cnn.com/POLITICS

 

*Library of Congress. 6 October 2015. http://thomas.loc.gov

 

McCulloch v. Maryland, Federalism Activity. Landmark Cases. Supreme Court Historical Society and Street Law. 2002. 6 October 2015. http://www.landmarkcases.org/mcculloch/federalismactivitiy.html

 

*The Official State of Michigan Web Site. 6 October 2015. http://www.michigan.gov/som

 

Overview of County Government. National Association of Counties. 22 August 2009.

 

Yahoo Directory: Local Newspapers. Yahoo. 22 August 2009.

 

Teacher Resource

Amar, Akhil Reed. 2002. “2000 Daniel J. Meador Lecture: Hugo Black and the Hall of Fame." Alabama Law Review, 1221. 6 October 2015. http://law.jrank.org/pages/7578/Incorporation-Doctrine.html#ixzz0I3AyujWc&D

 

Barth, Alan, The Roots of Limited Government. Feb. 2001. 22 August 2009.

 

Exploring Constitutional Conflicts: The Commerce Clause Limitations on State Regulations. University of Missouri-Kansas Law School. 6 October 2015. http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/conlaw/statecommerce.htm

 

Free Speech and the State Action Requirement. Exploring Constitutional Conflcts. University of Missouri-Kansas Law School. 6 October 2015. http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/conlaw/firstamstateaction.htm

 

Garcia v. San Antonio Metro Transit Authority. Oyez. U.S. Supreme Court Media. 6 October 2015. http://www.oyez.org/cases/1980-1989/1983/1983_82_1913

 

Gibbons v. Ogden. Oyez. U.S. Supreme Court Media. 6 October 2015. http://www.oyez.org/cases/1792-1850/1824/1824_0/

 

Gonzales v. Raich. Oyez. U.S. Supreme Court Media. 6 October 2015. http://www.oyez.org/cases/2000-2009/2004/2004_03_1454

 

Heart of Atlanta Motel v. U.S. Oyez. U.S. Supreme Court Media. 6 October 2015. http://www.oyez.org/cases/1960-1969/1964/1964_515

 

Helpful Handouts. The Initiative & Referendum Institute. University of Southern California. 6 October 2015. http://www.iandrinstitute.org/Quick%20Fact-Handouts.htm

 

The Incorporation Debate. Exploring Constitutional Conflicts. University of Missouri-Kansas Law School. 6 October 2015. http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/FTrials/conlaw/incorp.htm

 

Landmark Supreme Court Cases. Supreme Court Historical Society. Street Law. 2002. 6 October 2015.

http://www.landmarkcases.org

 

Learn About Counties. National Association of Counties. 6 October 2015. http://www.naco.org/Template.cfm?Section=Learn_About_Counties&Template=/ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID=29809

 

Letter of Governor Granholm. 12 Feb. 2009. Office of the State Budget. State of Michigan. 6 October 2015. http://www.michigan.gov/budget

 

Lopez v. Gonzales. Oyez. U.S. Supreme Court Media. 6 October 2015. http://www.oyez.org/cases/2000-2009/2006/2006_05_547

 

McCulloch v. Maryland. Oyez. U.S. Supreme Court Media. 6 October 2015. http://www.oyez.org/cases/1792-1850/1819/1819_0

 

Michigan County Directory. Michigan Start Pages, LLC. 22 August 2009.

 

Michigan State and Local Government. State and Local Government on the Net. 6 October 2015. http://www.statelocalgov.net/state-mi.cfm

 

Morgan v. Commonwealth of Virginia. Law Library – American Law and Legal Information. 6 October 2015. http://law.jrank.org/pages/13347/Morgan-v-Commonwealth-Virginia.html

 

Oakland Schools Teaching Research Writing Website: Skills Progression & Lessons http://www.osteachingresearchwriting.org/

 

Pope, R.R. Rule of Law. Political Science 101. Illinois State University. 22 August 2009.

 

Project Citizen. Center for Civic Education. 6 October 2015. http://www.civiced.org/index.php?page=introduction

 

Racial Discrimination and the State Action Requirement. Exploring Constitutional Conflcts. University of Missouri-Kansas Law School. 6 October 2015. http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/conlaw/stateaction.htm

 

State Comparisons. Federation of Tax Administrators. 6 October 2015. http://www.taxadmin.org/fta/rate/tax_stru.html

 

State Legislative Back to School Coordinators Roster. National Conference of State Legislatures. 6 October 2015. http://www.ncsl.org/LegislaturesElections/LegislatorsBacktoSchoolProgram/StateCoordinatorsRoster/tabid/15787/Default.aspx

 

Stearns, Maxwell. “The New Commerce Clause Doctrine in the Game Theoretical Perspective.” University of Maryland Law School. 6 October 2015. http://digitalcommons.law.umaryland.edu/fac_pubs/51/

 

United States v. Lopez. Further Readings. Law Library – American Law and Legal Information. 6 October 2015. http://law.jrank.org/pages/12812/United-States-v-Lopez.html

 

“What are ballot proposition, initiatives, and referendums?” The Initiative and Referendum Institute. University of Southern California.6 October 2015. http://www.iandrinstitute.org/Quick%20Fact%20-%20What%20is%20I&R.htm

 

Wickard v. Filburn. Oyez. U.S. Supreme Court Media. 6 October 2015. http://www.oyez.org/cases/1940-1949/1942/1942_59

 

For Further Professional Knowledge

Barbour, Christine and Gerald C. Wright. Keeping the Republic: Power and Citizenship in American Politics, The Essentials, 4th ed. Washington, DC: CQ Press, 2008.

Cigler, Allan J. and Burdett A. Loomis. American Politics: Classic and Contemporary Readings Boston: Houghton-Mifflin, 1995.Ginsberg, Benjamin, Theodore J. Lowi and Margaret Weir. We the People: An Introduction to American Politics, 5th ed. NY: W.W. Norton, Co., 2004.

 

Greene, Jack P. The Intellectual Construction of America. Chapel Hill, NC: Univ of North Carolina Press, 1997.

 

Kernell, Samuel and Steven S. Smith. Principles and Practice of American Politics: Classic and Contemporary Readings, 3rd ed. Washington, DC: CQ Press, 2006.

 

- - - and Gary C. Jacobson. 2006. The Logic of American Politics. CQ Press. 4th ed., Washington, DC: CQ Press, 2008.

 

O’Connor, Karen and Larry J. Sabato. Essentials of American Government: Roots and Reform. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, 2009.

 

Peters, Ellen Ash. Role of State Constitutions in Our Federal System. 22 August 2009.

 

 

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Expectations/Standards
MI: Social Studies (2007)
High School
Civics & Government
C1 Conceptual Foundations of Civic and Political Life
1.1 Nature of Civic Life, Politics, and Government Explain the meaning of civic life, politics, and government through the investigation of such questions as: What is civic life? What are politics? What is government? What are the purposes of politics and government?
1.1.1 Identify roles citizens play in civic and private life, with emphasis on leadership.
1.2 Alternative Forms of Government
Describe constitutional government and contrast it with other forms of government through the investigation of such questions as: What are essential characteristics of limited and unlimited government? What is constitutional government? What forms can a constitutional government take?
1.2.4 Compare and contrast direct and representative democracy.
2.2 Foundational Values and Constitutional Principles of American Government
Explain how the American idea of constitutional government has shaped a distinctive American society through the investigation of such questions as: How have the fundamental values and principles of American constitutional government shaped American society?
2.2.5 Use examples to investigate why people may agree on constitutional principles and fundamental values in the abstract, yet disagree over their meaning when they are applied to specific situations.
C3 STRUCTURE AND Functions of Government in THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
3.1 Structure, Functions, and Enumerated Powers of National Government Describe how the national government is organized and what it does through the investigation of such questions as: What is the structure of the national government? What are the functions of the national government? What are its enumerated powers?
3.1.5 Use case studies or examples to examine tensions between the three branches of government (e.g., powers of the purse and impeachment, advise and consent, veto power, and judicial review).
3.1.6 Evaluate major sources of revenue for the national government, including the constitutional provisions for taxing its citizens.
3.1.7 Explain why the federal government is one of enumerated powers while state governments are those of reserved powers.
3.2 Powers and Limits on Powers
Identify how power and responsibility are distributed, shared, and limited in American constitutional government through the investigation of such questions as: How are power and responsibility distributed, shared, and limited in the government established by the United States Constitution?
3.2.1 Explain how the principles of enumerated powers, federalism, separation of powers, bicameralism, checks and balances, republicanism, rule of law, individual rights, inalienable rights, separation of church and state, and popular sovereignty serve to limit the power of government.
3.2.2 Use court cases to explain how the Constitution is maintained as the supreme law of the land
3.2.3 Identify specific provisions in the Constitution that limit the power of the federal government.
3.2.4 Explain the role of the Bill of Rights and each of its amendments in restraining the power of government over individuals.
3.2.5 Analyze the role of subsequent amendments to the Constitution in extending or limiting the power of government, including the Civil War/Reconstruction Amendments and those expanding suffrage.
3.3 Structure and Functions of State and Local Governments
Describe how state and local governments are organized and what they do through the investigation of such questions as: What are the structures and functions of state and local government?
3.3.1 Describe limits the U.S. Constitution places on powers of the states (e.g., prohibitions against coining money, impairing interstate commerce, making treaties with foreign governments) and on the federal government’s power over the states (e.g., federal government cannot abolish a state, Tenth Amendment reserves powers to the states).
3.3.2 Identify and define states’ reserved and concurrent powers.
3.3.3 Explain the tension among federal, state, and local governmental power using the necessary and proper clause, the commerce clause, and the Tenth Amendment.
3.3.4 Describe how state and local governments are organized, their major responsibilities, and how they affect the lives of citizens.
3.3.5 Describe the mechanisms by which citizens monitor and influence state and local governments (e.g., referendum, initiative, recall).
3.3.6 Evaluate the major sources of revenue for state and local governments.
3.3.7 Explain the role of state constitutions in state governments.
3.5 Other Actors in the Policy Process
Describe the roles of political parties, interest groups, the media, and individuals in determining and shaping public policy through the investigation of such questions as: What roles do political parties, interest groups, the media, and individuals play in the development of public policy?
3.5.8 Evaluate, take, and defend positions about the formation and implementation of a current public policy issue, and examine ways to participate in the decision making process about the issue.
C5 Citizenship in the United States of America
5.1 The Meaning of Citizenship in the United States of America
Describe the meaning of citizenship in the United States through the investigation of such questions as: What is the meaning of citizenship in the United States? What are the rights, responsibilities, and characteristics of citizenship in the United States?
5.1.2 Compare the rights of citizenship Americans have as a member of a state and the nation.
C6 Citizenship in Action
6.1 Civic Inquiry and Public Discourse Use forms of inquiry and construct reasoned arguments to engage in public discourse around policy and public issues by investigating the question: How can citizens acquire information, solve problems, make decisions, and defend positions about public policy issues?
6.1.1 Identify and research various viewpoints on significant public policy issues.
6.2 Participating in Civic Life
Describe multiple opportunities for citizens to participate in civic life by investigating the question: How can citizens participate in civic life?
6.2.11 Identify typical issues, needs, or concerns of citizens (e.g., seeking variance, zoning changes, information about property taxes), and actively demonstrate ways citizens might use local governments to resolve issues or concerns.
Copyright © 2001-2015 State of Michigan
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Wayne RESA